Rabbit vaccinations

Vaccinating your rabbit is important to ensure they thrive and stay happy and healthy. Find out more about rabbit vaccinations including what vaccinations are required and when.

Do rabbits need vaccinations?

As with most common pets, its important to get your rabbit vaccinated to prevent a lot of heartbreak. Even if your rabbit is a house rabbit, we strongly recommend they get vaccinated as disease can enter the house in myriad ways. Rabbits have diseases such as Myxomatosis that are preventable. 

Your local Medivet will help with identifying the right vaccinations for your rabbit. Find your local practice. 

What vaccinations do rabbits need?

To be fully protected, rabbits need to be vaccinated against:

What does the Myxo RHD PLUS vaccination cover?

Myxo RHD PLUS will provide protection from myxomatosis and also both strains of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD1 and RHD2).

If your rabbit is vaccinated and you would like to know more about the new Myxo RHD PLUS vaccination, your vet will be happy to discuss this with you.

Please contact your vet with any questions that you have around rabbit vaccinations.

How many vaccinations do rabbits need? 

Until recently, in order to ensure that your rabbit was protected from both myxomatosis and both strains of RHD, they would have been given two separate vaccinations.

A new vaccination called Myxo RHD PLUS is now available and is a combined vaccine for all three of these potentially fatal diseases. This means that your rabbit only needs a single vaccination to be fully protected.

How often do rabbits need to be vaccinated?

The introduction of the new vaccine has caused some confusion for rabbit owners. We recommend that rabbits are regularly vaccinated and this can be done from five weeks of age.

If your rabbit has not been vaccinated in the last 12 months, then you should contact your vet and discuss vaccinations as quickly as possible.

If your rabbit has had a single vaccination some time ago, they may not be protected from myxomatosis and both strains of RHD. Since these diseases can be fatal for rabbits, it’s worth checking with your vet as soon as possible.

If your rabbit has always been regularly vaccinated and is up to date with their vaccinations against myxomatosis and both strains of RHD; the combination of these two vaccines will mean that your rabbit has adequate protection. You will be offered the new vaccination at your next vaccination appointment.

 

It is not recommended that rabbits go outside without injections as they can catch diseases from other animals, insects and even in the air. Some of these diseases can be fatal and a vaccinated rabbit stands a better chance of fighting them.

Rabbits can be vaccinated from 5 weeks of age.

Even house rabbits need vaccinating as diseases can be transmitted on your clothes, shoes, hay and other materials rabbits come into contact with. Some of the diseases can lay dormant for a long time.

Rabbits need yearly injections.

Healthcare Plans for rabbits

Help protect your pet from disease and ensure they live a long and happy life with the Medivet Healthcare Plan specially designed for rabbits.

Book your rabbit's vaccination

Find your local Medivet practice and book your rabbit's vaccination

Rabbit beside hutch

Pet Advice

Rabbits and Myxomatosis

We recommend rabbits are vaccinated every 12 months to protect them against contracting potentially fatal diseases such as Myxomatosis.

Pet Advice

Protecting your rabbit against RHD2

Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease variant two (RHD2 or VHD2) is a relatively new and fatal disease affecting rabbits across the UK. Learn more about this highly contagious virus and how to prevent it.

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Our Rabbit Care Guide

Keep your rabbit healthy and happy with our essential guide.

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